Fields of Dreams

Fields of Dreams

fields, dreams, poetry

~

radiant blue skies

golden pastures of tallgrass

ignite fields of dreams

~

I’ve always loved the openness of prairie lands with their golden grasses and endless vistas. For me, the open vistas invite an inner opening. My body, mind, and being all open and relax in response to these views. I would love to lie down, relax, and daydream for hours.

Prairies are considered the rarest and most fragmented ecosystem in the country with a risk of being lost forever. Vast tallgrass prairies once extended from Manitoba to Texas and eastward into Indiana with huge bison herds and Native American tribes freely roaming. Today, only 2,000 acres of the original two million acres of tallgrass prairie in this region of the country are not plowed or damaged. Sadly, the genocide of both bison and native people are largely ignored in our schools and history. If we made amends, we might free up the creative energies and resources to restore this once beautiful land.

May your dreams flourish.

75 thoughts on “Fields of Dreams

  1. Wow, Brad, this gave me chills. I read the words before I saw the photo and you took me right there. (love it when that happens!!). Your statistics are sobering, to say the very least. You know I’m a hardcore environmentalist, but I admittedly overlook the prairies and loss thereof. We need leadership that will go to the extreme to reverse the utter destruction we have wreaked on our planet, we need people on the ground fighting for it and educating the masses. So, thank you. And thank you for this beautiful visual to start my day. πŸ™‚ H & S.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Love your poetry Brad, and that picture is stunning with blue skies and tall grasses… Yes pastures are rare even here as meadows no longer are just left to be, and there was a plan way back in the sixties here in the UK that farmers would get paid to plough up meadows and fields… They didn’t as I remember it even have to plant anything…
    The best meadows I have have ever been in which were untouched, full of wild flowers, bees, insect life and dragonflies was in Austria… They left their meadows harvesting only for hay and feed… And it was a beautiful sight..
    Its so sad that so many Acres of the Prairies are now lost… also the Buffalo and other wild life…

    Have a great week Brad… Take care my friend πŸ™‚ πŸ™πŸ’š

    Liked by 1 person

  3. I didn’t know prairies are so rare. I find their vastness so humble and humbling. I read somewhere that meadows symbolize vulnerability and those who feel at peace in them are comfortable being vulnerable. I wonder if that idea can be applied to prairies as well. Wishing you fruitful daydreams.

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  4. I remember my dad describing Colorado to me as prairie land. It was hard to imagine it as I looked out over the dry dirt and sagebrush. So tragic. And thank you for mentioning the genocide of the native peoples. It’s completely ignored in our schools and in the country as a whole, and the legacy of mistreatment and theft will continue until the truth and shame are faced, examined, and accepted. Well, sorry to rant. Your poem is beautiful and I hope you get to daydream a little in the golden prairie.

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  5. Your words, Brad, ….
    “Sadly, the genocide of both bison and native people are largely ignored in our schools and history. If we made amends, we might free up the creative energies and resources to restore this once beautiful land.” gave me the goosebumps. I couldn’t agree with you more! When I hear truths regarding what has happened within this country in such a brief span of time, my soul shudders. I’ve never seen the prairies. I have a park close by that is the closest to it. I can’t wait to go back …. the “energy” there is special.

    Liked by 1 person

      • Brad, my parents both worked for a private college in Cedar Rapids and their goal while the four of us kids were growing up was to have us see all of the United States. They always had August off, so they’d load up the camping tent, equip, etc…load us into the family station wagon and travel around different parts of the country. Point being it I knew Iowa wasn’t where I wanted to stay when I grew up and sure enough, didn’t. Nothing against Iowa, I just fell in love with other places….

        Liked by 1 person

  6. I don’t know much about prairies and have only seen them in passing as a child when my family crossed the country by car. Thank you for enlightening me. I bet you can see a lot of stars there at night. I love your vision of restoration.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Wonderful poem and photo.
    I had no idea that prairies are considered the rarest and most fragmented ecosystem in the country. Thanks for sharing. I can never appreciate enough how amazing our planet is. We must continue to care for it.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. I certainly learned nothing about the genocide of Native Americans when I went to high school. However, when I tutored at a nearby NE high school for ten years and attended history classes with my special ed students, I learned the truth. First, we must teach the truth, then we must make amends (not done at all yet) and save what is still standing. The prairies. And the humans who tended them so well. Beautiful prose here, Brad.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Isn’t it amazing that just two weeks ago we were talking about dreams and spring and now we’re in this odd dystopian environment? Your photo above and words were a balm for me today. Thanks!

    Liked by 1 person

  10. I so agree with this, and also I believe that the view of the American and other Indians as savages need to disappear from our world. People are learning too many bad things about people who were all put here on this earth as we were. If the world was not meant to hold all of us, we would not be here. Thank you for your good post.

    Liked by 1 person

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